Textured Paper



Getting back to a year of lightness and freedom includes adding daily creativity projects of some sort to our day.

With no rigidity.

Because Isaiah. Boy+sensory processing disorder+boy+wacko= minute amounts of tolerance for structured art activities that take longer than 10 minutes.

So. Textured paper. I decided that I’d like to do some art projects this year that involve using paper as a decorative component and the best way to do that is to create our own textured paper.

Also, delayed gratification is a complete unknown in this house. So learning that can only be good.

And, cutting up a creation? Talk about trauma. This is a lesson in letting go.


Watercolor paper and tempera paints worked great for us.

We tried 4 styles of textured paper. Spirals, sponging, stripes and wax resist.

After spiral and a little sponging Isaiah asked if he could “just paint.” Unlike the olden days I said sure!


First he painted me as a big fat purple monster. That was awesome.

Then he painted a beautiful landscape with bushes and clouds.

I finished the rest of the textured paper and set it to dry.

I have some ideas of what we will do with it, maybe some weaving or making a pretty garland. You’ll have to come back to see.

Here’s how we did what we did:

Spirals dip a dry brush with a flat head in your paint. Starting from the inside create a spiral until the paint has run out on the brush. Any size will work.


Sponging I have lots of cut up sponges from other projects, so we used a small piece and dipped it in the paint sponging until it began to fade and then dipping again. We covered the whole piece of paper and let it dry and then did another color on top.


Stripes choose 2 colors that blend well I used yellow and red, but blue and yellow or blue and green might be nice. I started with yellow stripes going one direction trying to have just enough paint on a wide flat brush to make it all the way across. Then while the paint is still wet add a little bit of the second color to the first color so the next set of stripes is a blend without being mixed. After that set make diagonal lines with the two colors mixed.

Wax Resist take a crayon and rub it on its side very hard all over the piece of paper. Then water down some paint and do a very thin wash over the whole page. Where the wax is the paint won’t stick. (This did not work so well for us. It might be because we didn’t rub hard enough, or maybe because we used such a heavy watercolor paper. Either way, if I get it right I will share that here)

homeschool_textured paper table

Using Galileo to Study Astronomy, Math, History and Physics

Galileo Graphic

In light of my discovery that a significant amount of Astrophysicists have dyslexia, I decided to start our year studying Galileo. Of course you don’t have to have dyslexia to study Galileo, nor do you have to have dyslexia to use this lesson block.

This block can also be adapted to any age, many of the books we loved most were picture books that really glossed over the inquisition, and watching the night sky is fun for any age!

Galileo is really the perfect person to use to study moon phases. And September is a great time to study the moon because it is usually clear, and the temperature is perfect for spending evenings outside.

(One of the great things about homeschooling, is it really doesn’t matter how late it is when the moon comes out!)

Here’s an outline of our block on Galileo, and how, by chosing one larger topic, we are able to learn a number of subjects.

Who was Galileo?

We began by reading books on Galileo to familiarize ourselves with who he was, and what made him tick. For fun we also included the book How They Croaked, because boys love gruesome! We also watched a video to create a deeper understanding by incorporating the visual. (I will include a reading list at the end of the post.)

Using a telescope

We learned that Galileo invented the telescope as we know it today,  and in turn, invented the microscope as well.

We decided to use the telescope the same way Galileo did, we observed the moon, and made drawings of what we saw. It was fun, and a little creepy, to do this outside at night, just as Galileo did.

Creating a Calendar

We choose to create a calendar that would outline the moon phases so we could see if our observations through our telescope matched the recorded, and expected moon phases. This can be done with the naked eye, you do not need a telescope.

In creating the calendar we incorporated the mathematic principles of columns and rows, and using measurements and division.

In order to create a calendar we had to decide how to divide a piece of paper to have even columns and rows. 

We then needed to use a ruler to make our measurements, and then use it again to draw our straight lines.

Then we choose to write our dates in the first row only, so we could practice our +7 addition facts going down the column.

Because this was the month of September, we also took this opportunity to learn the rhyme:

30 days pass September;
April, June and November.

We will continue to create a calendar at the beginning of every month.


Galileo lived during a very important time in history. We took this opportunity to talk about the Renaissance and other famous people and advancements made during this time.

He also lived during the Inquisition, a dark time in the history of the Catholic Church. We talked about why this happened, and the consequences it had on the advancement of science.

This was also a good time to briefly discuss Aristotle and Copernicus. As Galileo debunked many of Aristotle’s theories, and attempted to uphold Copernicus.

We also had the opportunity to talk a little bit about Pisa, Venice, Rome and Padua. All places that Galileo lived at one time or another.


Galileo was the first scientist to debunk Aristotle’s statement that objects fell at varying speeds based on their weight.

Galileo discovered that objects fell at the same rate regardless of their weight, and demonstrated this by dropping a cannon ball and a musket ball from the top of the bell tower we know as the Leaning Tower of Pisa.


Galileo made many discoveries that were worthy of learning about. Of course most importantly, and all of them fall under the umbrella, of proving that the earth, and all of the planets revolve around the sun.

This of course was against the Catholic church’s belief that the Earth was the center of the universe and all planets revolved around it.

Galileo was the first person to identify Jupiter’s four moons, and in order to impress the Medici family, he named the moons after the four Medici sons.


As the inventor of the first microscope, Galileo was the first to make drawings of insects and discovered the beauty of the natural world on a miniature scale.


Learning about Galileo has been enlightening and fun. We have been inspired to recreate some of his experiments, and have had a renewed interest in the night sky.

What I love about learning this way, is it has sparked many spontaneous and random conversations about The Inquisition, the planets, and history in general.

We are really enjoying our time delving deeper into this subject, and based on what interests us most, we will choose our next victim!


Galileo’s Leaning Tower Experiment by Wendy Macdonald

galileo leaning tower

I, Galileo by Bonnie Christensen

i, galileo

How They Croaked by Georgia Bragg and Kevin O’Malley


Books on the Moon and Planets:

Jump into Science: Moon by Steve Tomecek

moon book


13 Planets: The LAtest View of the Solar System by David Aguilar

13 planets


The Moon: Astronaut Travel Guides

moon astronaut travel guides


Boy, Were we wrong about the Solar System! by Kathleen Kudlinski

boy were we wrong solar system


Fly Guy Presents Space by Tedd Arnold

fly guy space


Two GREAT videos. I am a big fan of using videos with Isaiah. He seems to retain things so much more when we utilize every aspect of his senses.

Start Smart Science; I need to Know All About the Moon – I could not find this on Amazon, I got this video from my Library and highly recommend it!

Astronomy with Bill Nye This is another video to get from the Library, it is made by Discovery School, and you shouldn’t have a problem finding it. It covers many of the issues that you will find yourself discussion as part of your Galileo lesson.


Books we found that were not so great:
Galileo, ( his life and ideas) for Kids by Richard Panchyk (way too involved and intense)
Who Was Galileo? by Patricia Brennan Demuth (also, way too wordy)
Starry Messenger by Peter Sis (The pictures are super complicated, the text is way too basic)

I would love to hear how you used Galileo to explore your homeschool studies!


He Might Be a Reluctant Reader, Or Maybe He Can’t Read – How I Missed My Son’s Dyslexia

-If you've told a child a thousand times (1)




I just read that Tom Cruise could barely read or write until he was 19. Then he got his first role, and realized that he would need to be able to read to become the actor he wanted to be.

Unfortunately, I don’t have a starring role in a hit film to motivate my son to read.

And I would guess, if given the choice to work his butt off to learn how to read so he could star in the next Mission Impossible film, or to not read at all, right about now, I’m thinking he’d choose – not read.

Being 10 (or wherever your child may be) and lacking such strong external motivation, I have to support him where he is. And right now, he’s a kid who thinks the world thinks he’s dumb because he can’t read, and that Dyslexia is a four letter word. (I know there’s a joke in there somewhere.)

So, when I happened upon this quote, I realized what I had been doing wrong for the last few years.

If you’ve told a child a thousand times and he still does not understand, then it is not the child who is the slow learner.

I have been calling my son a reluctant reader since he was 5.

When every other kid was sounding out Sandra Boynton’s Moo Baa LaLaLa mine was happily listening to me read it.

It didn’t matter how often I ran my finger under every word, he just sat there happy as a clam as I read.

The years passed and I read.

Make no mistake, he loved books! And as an extension, loved being read to.

So many hours spent at the Library picking out books. Books to read, audio books to listen to in the car. Books, books and more books.

But we had a secret, a secret perpetuated even more so by the fact that he has such a gifted vocabulary. The secret was that he couldn’t read.

In all of my homeschooling books and curriculum, I had often read how when a child is ready to read, he will read. And so I waited.

And waited.

Sometime around 8, I started quietly asking around other homeschool moms and groups, and every where I went I got the same answer. “When he’s ready, he’ll read.”

I heard stories about 11 year olds who finally were motivated to read when they wanted to learn code, or wanted to become the best at a video game, and then the next thing you know they were reading 700 page books.

So I waited. I waited and I watched, but in my heart I knew something was wrong.

Because Isaiah did want to read. Reluctant reader was not really the right term for him. Kid who couldn’t read and was super frustrated whenever he tried and had tantrums and fits would have been more accurate.

But I am nothing if not a Queen of Denial, and I was trying. MAN I WAS TRYING.

I defended his reading reluctance to my family. I felt threatened and hurt and scared. And secretly I worried I was making a mistake by not aggressively intervening.

But. If you’ve told a child a thousand times and he still does not understand, then it is not the child who is the slow learner.

It took me aggressively intervening to realize he was not ever going to learn to read like other kids.

There was not going to be an Aha! moment. He wasn’t going to pick up Harry Potter and devour it in one weekend curled up on the sofa with a do not disturb sign.

And so I sought help from a professional.

As I sat across the desk from a really super nice doctor guy, who doesn’t pull any punches, but at least punches you with a sense of humor. I sincerely believed that he would tell me my son was fine, the problem was I was not teaching him correctly.

Instead I heard. “Your son has severe dyslexia, and how far he has gotten is a testament to how hard you have worked with him.”

*record scratch*

Apparently there is not a diagnosis of reluctant reader. That’s not actually a medical term, or a learning disability. For me that term helped perpetuate the denial I was living in. And I used that term to help other’s perpetuate their’s as well.

It did not help my son.

Time spent looking back on the “what if’s” and the “shouldas” is time wasted. And so I do my best not to go there.

Time spent sharing my story, is like spreading gold. If one mom in one group had said to me, “Your story sounds just like my son, and it turned out my son had dyslexia.” Well then, she would have saved a lot of tears and tantrums, and been a true blessing to this family.

And so I am sharing this story and our journey with you. Because if you share this with just one mom of a “reluctant reader” and she hears you. Then my work here is done.


I wrote a post about how I came to grips with those feelings right after the diagnosis on my other blog, it’s too soon to repost it, so you can go read it here.

Stay tuned by subscribing to my blog, this week I will outline our week one curriculum. And I will be sharing my thoughts on the Gifts of Dyslexia.



We’ll be Homeschooling Dyslexia

You may have noticed my blog went on an unannounced hiatus last year.

We had a good reason. A reason I couldn’t write about at the time, because being so close to it, I didn’t know what to say.

Last year was a hard year. A very very trying year, and I would be lying if I didn’t admit that I was considering public school by January. I wrote all about how it felt at my other blog.

We spent so much time fighting, there were tantrums, there was some serious acting out. There was a lot of sadness and anxiety.

Because my son couldn’t read. 

Over the summer, Isaiah (10), was diagnosed with Dyslexia.

At first my heart was broken. I come from a family of readers. To me, reading has always meant a book. With pages. Learning that for him reading would probably mean a book, with audio, was a little jarring.

We have had a few months to get use to the idea. And now? Well now I am so relieved! And excited to get on with a school year with only the average amount of arguing!

As I begin our homeschool year, I realize that homeschooling with Dyslexia will probably be not much different than homeschooling was for us before.

With the exception of not having to force him to read, we will probably not change much.

We are going to start our year with Galileo and move on to Winston Churchill (a famous dyslexic!)

Stay tuned for my next post on our plans for Galileo.


Sensory Spelling and Modeling Beeswax

We’ve really been jumping all over the place here.  I don’t know about you.

Even though I had the curriculum all ironed out, I just never know what will happen as I start a new school year.

Isaiah is a person. And as a person his likes and dislikes change. What works for him changes. And to be honest, I don’t do well with change.

And so I went back to what I know works, and we started a Waldorf spelling block. I’m adding it in twice a week. We have never done “spelling” per se so I am starting from the beginning with the first 100 of the High Utility 500 words.

And since this is Waldorf,

waldorf spelling


The beauty of Waldorf is they did Sensory work, before Sensory was cool.

We pulled out the box of modeling beeswax.

I have to say I really missed the modeling beeswax, and I didn’t realize how much until we started using it.

You can’t get anymore sensory integrated than having to wait patiently as the beeswax warms in your hands, as it warms you begin to smell that light comforting smell that is uniquely beeswax. Slowly you begin rolling it in your hands, it warms more and becomes more and more malleable until it’s ready to use.

The whole process is so integrated with the senses that it has a very calming effect. The key is getting your child there.

Isaiah is impatient. And at first refused to take the time to grab a lump and let it warm up.

So I grabbed a lump and worked on it as I walked around the room.

When I came back I found him working carefully on his own beeswax project. Even he couldn’t resist that feeling. It also speaks to just doing it, and waiting for your child to follow. Don’t press, just do.


Working in beeswax is completely unique and inviting. It responds so well to your directions. Even the artistically challenged can make something look like what they (I) want.

spelling modeling beeswax waldorf


The road became clear to me when yesterday I asked him to spell “the” as we were driving home from his allergy shots.

His response? “We don’t do spelling mom.” and then after some negotiating “th”.

I found this odd, I know he can read that word just fine. But clearly the idea of spelling was foreign to him. You have to start somewhere, right? Immediately I realized Waldorf’s method of learning to spell was going to be the right answer for us.

So today, I handed him my warmed up red and asked him to spell “of.”spelling with modeling beeswax

At first he resisted, but then he formed the letters carefully and put them in front of me.

We continued through the first 9 words of the first 100. And amazingly, even though he couldn’t spell them as we drove down the street, he had no problem modeling them out of beeswax.

Score 1 for Waldorf, or more like 100!

Of course I am nothing if not a crazy, whatever method works for you, homeschooling mom. And so this happened too.

spelling modeling beeswax unschooling


Here are some tips for Waldorf – Sensory Spelling.

Modeling Beeswax, slowly warm and then form the words.

Write the words in whatever handwriting your child enjoys using colored pencils or beeswax crayons, and then walk to the other side of the room and write it again, either the same way or a different way.

Then on his way back to you, have him walk the letters of the word he’s spelling.

Make it fun, encourage him, do it with him if he’s being resistant.

I know everything there is to know about a child who won’t do it “because.” He doesn’t need a reason to say no, me asking is usually enough. So be gentle, do it yourself at first if you need to.

I am very confident this will work for your reluctant speller!

working with modeling beeswax


Please feel free to ask any questions or share your ideas for sensory spelling!



When You Are Home Sick and Home Schooled

I had the best of intentions this week, as you may have noticed, the month was all planned out. I did so well, the boy didn’t even know Monday was a holiday. I’m tricky that way.

As it happened, it didn’t matter. Because sometime late night Monday early morning Tuesday, this happened:

“Mom, I feel yucky, mom….mom….wake up. Can I watch something?”

By 9am we were on our way to the doctor’s and long story short.  We took the rest of the week off.


If you’ve read the page about The Boy, you would know that this is just par for the course. Nothing holds this kid back, sometimes we just have to take a break.

But that’s why we homeschool right?

This week I had already decided to switch things up a little, add Don Quixote into our reading. Since I had a captive audience, that’s just what I did.

Today he was feeling better while he was resting. Not so much after he realized he felt better and wanted to run around. Then the coughing would return, and we’d take a little break. And then he’d be back to his old tricks.

I figured that was as good of a time as any to throw in a little learnin’ (she says in a her best western accent).

It’s amazing what a few days of idleness can produce. That kid got to thinking. And the next think you know, this happened:

rube goldberg homeschool








If you’ve never “met” Isaiah, check out this video. It’s short and sweet, and it’s about this Rube Goldberg machine he made. I was really proud of him for spending about an hour, uninterrupted working out his plan. He drew it out and everything. So he made a little video showing us all how it works.

The Kalabazoo by Isaiah

We are closing down Isaiah’s blog at IsaiahDotCom. After much deliberation, I decided that there was no reason for both of these blogs. I think everyone who is interested in homeschooling would be interested in what he creates with his unencumbered mind. And so, on Friday’s, I will post something that is uniquely Isaiah.


The Kalabazoo

the kalabazoo


I’ve been eaten by a Kalabazoo

A horrible nasty Kalabazo

Now please close this book

I don’t want him to eat you too.

So if anyone asks you

what’s a Kalabazoo

say you don’t want to find out.

Whatever you do,

if you have a rhyme book never got to page 22.

Third Grade Curriculum – September

homeschool home school curriculum

I will try to get next month up before we start, we started the last week of August. Here is an overview of what I hope to accomplish in the month of September.

Click here for an example of our schedule in google docs, please feel free to use it and then fill in the blanks.

Our school day tends to be about 4 hours long, when teaching one or two children there is no need to spend excessive time on a subject. For us this includes lunch, a snack and playtime!

home school reluctant reader


Read aloud from reading level appropriate reader. For us this is about 15-20 minutes depending on how goofy he’s being.

4 pages from Explode the Code ( we are in book 3)

Cursive Practice – Ask your child for a sentence from the story you read

Math U See – we are in the Alpha book, we picked up again at exactly the halfway mark. My plan is to do 1 or 2 lessons a week depending on where he gets stuck. Rushing it never helped anyone!

Literature – Folk Tales in the evening from Oak Meadow Folk Tales book 2 or 3 times a week. (I am sure you can find a folk tales book in the library and a great FREE online resource is MainLesson.com you can search the site by genre. In the fairy tales section you can find folk stories and fairy tales from other cultures, which are essentially folk tales.) We read the story in the evening, or in the afternoon. The next day I ask Isaiah to retell it to me as he draws me a picture or series of pictures that he feels relate to the story. I do not lead him or guide him at all. If he wants to change the story as long as I feel like it started somewhere with the original story I’m cool with that.
If you have not read the Grimm Fairy Tales this would also be a good time for that.

Get Outside – Every morning we try to take a walk around the block and check out what’s changing in the seasons, it is also a good time to quiet our minds and get ready for the day. I try to remind Isaiah to not chatter on, by mentioning that I hear crickets or birds, and asking questions about them.
And of course plenty of play time throughout the day!

Week 1:

Folk TalesThe Fox’s Snack, The Mighty Caterpillar and The Queen’s Gifts

Science – ( you can do this M, W, F or over 2 days – we do the rotation models one day, and the tide video a second day)

Earth’s rotation, illustrated using that old-fashioned model of a balloon slowly rotating around a lamp without a shade. Draw a little stick figure on the balloon so he understands where we are in relation to the sun during the day and evening. Although this was not a new concept for most kids, it’s fun!

The Moon – Add a smaller balloon (this is now a two person job, you can use anything small and round) to illustrate the moon rotating around the earth. I explained that the Moon is large enough to effect our oceans.

Tides – There is no easier way to explain the tides than to watch a movie about. I recommend The Blue Planet – Tidal Seas. (I picked it up at the library) also The Magic School Bus Goes to Mussel Beach

Social Studies – (This year we are studying the Old Testament and Ancient Cultures) Read the story of The Garden of Eden and Cain and Abel (two separate days that should alternate with Folk Tales). (Once again a great resource for these stories are on Main Lesson.com  Hurlbut’s Story of the Bible)


Week 2:

Folk Tales: Jesper the Herder of Hares, The Faithful Friends (the musicians of Bremen),  and Prince Hyacinth

Science: How Plants Make Food – The Magic School Bus Gets Planted also Pushing and Pulling with balloon rockets.

Social Studies: Noah’s Ark and The Tower of Babel both of these present great opportunities for crafts and drawing.


Week 3:

Folk Tales: Rapunzel, The Gardener’s Son and The Pot of Honey

Science: Evaporation – place dishes with the same amount of water all over, and measure evaporation, talk about why it evaporated more in certain places.
The Magic School Bus – Wet All Over
Water Bead Fun!

Social Studies: This week we will spend the whole time reading about Abram’s journey and His choices.


Week 4:

Folk Tales: The Six Travellers, The Goat Eared Emperor, and Brother and Sister

Science: Salt Crystal Trees (this is a big project so we’re going to stick to one)

Social Studies: Continue our reading on Abram and how he becomes Abraham.


home school waldorf learn hebrew


Extra Stuff: Trips to the museum, so we may skip a day here or there. Learning Hebrew! And visiting some home bound relatives to brighten their days!

Remember! Each of those weeks includes the everyday list. Some weeks we don’t do science so intensely because for us science is a lot of everyday being outside. Also I embellish a lot as I go along, and will be writing about that weekly. So if you want to keep up with what we are doing, remember to hit the subscribe by email button!



home school curriculum third grade


What is a Main Lesson Book Anyway? Do I Need One?


main lesson books do i need

I don’t like rules.

When I started with Waldorf Homeschooling I kept hearing Main Lesson book, Main Lesson Book, Main Lesson Book.

Do this in your Math Main Lesson Book, do this in your Science Main Lesson Book and do this in your Literature Main Lesson Book. (Don’t even get me started on Form Drawing)

Listen lady, that’s too much for me to remember; let alone have, or spend money on, because my kid is a drawing fiend and I can’t say, “Hey! No! Don’t draw in that one, draw in this one!” That doesn’t seem very Waldorfy to me.

And don’t tell me only your best work can go in your main lesson book, because I am the child of a narcissist and when you say those things I feel the micromanager wake up inside me, and it says “The child must only put his best work in the main lesson book.” (in a scary voice) And by best, I mean best.

Back when he was in first grade I tried, that was before I realized it was okay for me to think outside the box, I was still trying to conform.

It was a nightmare. Yes, a nightmare. Don’t tell me I am exaggerating, because I most certainly am not.

My son is a drawing machine, if you don’t belive me check out this video. I cannot EVER tell him he can only draw on one page, or he needs to draw this picture just like me. Nor would I want him to. But I tried and it was bad….

Not to mention the fact that organization does not come easy to me.

So what is the solution you ask? The best one EVER. 100 page sketch books! For those of you who like to use drawing and creativity as part of your curriculum go to Michael’s when sketch books are buy one get one free. Like right now. And do what I do.

main lesson book or sketch book

Grab the first one and write the start date on it. Ours stays on our home school table, and by home school table I mean coffee table, with the box of colored pencils next to it. Whenever it’s time to draw he opens his sketch book and gets going. And if he wants to draw later in the day, he takes the same sketchbook and keeps going.

I know some Waldorf people will not be happy with this set-up, I’m not sure why. I think most might be relieved.

My understanding about the point of Main Lesson books was that all of your child’s work would be in one place and you or he, could go back and look at all of it. With Main Lesson books that’s a subject by subject deal, and if you run out of pages, then what?  I know that when you’re working on the alphabet you want to look back to yesterday, but if you are using the block system, then most likely all of your alphabet pictures will be grouped together anyway.

When you use a sketch book all of the lessons are in one book and when you run out of pages you just start a new one, and lessons continue. At the end of the year you have maybe two full sketch books, and ten years from now that will be much less cumbersome than dragging out 8 main lesson books, no?

main lesson books do I need

The First Day of Our Homeschool Rhythm

It’s not always easy to practice what you preach.

I put up a good fight, and tried to keep our rhythm this summer. Somewhere in the middle of July, it became a free for all. So of course I was concerned as we geared up for Day one.

No need.

Our day started Sunday night. I read him a Folk Tale called The Fox’s Snack before we went to bed.

He wanted more. Traditionally, in the summer, I’ll read forever. This time I said nope, it’s bed time and we’ll talk more about it tomorrow.

In the morning I let him sleep until he woke up.

Once he was up, uncrabby, dressed and snuggled on the sofa, I handed him his sketch book and colored pencils and said “I’m going to make you breakfast, while I do that can you tell me the story about the Fox that we read last night? And while you’re telling me, can you draw it too?” (of course this is me being tricky because he loves to draw as he tells a story)

His retelling was phenomenal, he retold it with his own twist! In the end the Fox steals a train!

Since his twist was so much fun, we decided our cursive sentence would be “The fox stole the train.” I wrote out the sentence and he traced it. Then I let him just play around with cursive for a while.

learning cursive waldorf

Also trying to explain why you can’t write cursive from bottom to top.

Then I read him a chapter of Charlotte’s Web (Trophy Newbery), and he read me Scholastic Reader Level 2: Inside a House That is Haunted.

in breath

In Breath

It was time for a break, and I told him to go play a little.

When he came back we were ready to review some math. We use Math U See, he really loves math and although we started with traditional Waldorf Gnome math, after a while that was too abstract for his very literal mind. And frankly, I find gnome math confusing.


Our next block was Science; I asked him if he wanted a break and he said no. At this point in his life it is fairly obvious to me when he needs an “out breath” or time to burn off some energy. He said he would rather keep going.

So we worked on learning about the Earth’s rotation around the sun using the old-fashioned method of balloon around a lamp. It was cool, we had a lot of fun, and afterwards Isaiah made a few balloon inventions and played while I did some chores.

out breath

Out Breath

Our day was over by 1:30, (we didn’t start until 10) and in there we took a mini walk to see some construction, he played on his scooter, had some tea, climbed a wall and had lunch.

It was a great day.


A few other mentionables. We have implemented a chore a day chart. He was pretty headstrong about that, I was headstronger.

He is also going to cook one meal a week, a simple meal, and of course I will be his sous chef.

We bought new colored pencils and sketch books to start our year off. We love these things Koh-I-Noor Progresso Woodless Colored Pencils 24 Color Set he wore his last set down to nubs. We stick them in a pencil-case and it goes with us wherever we go.


How is your homeschool prep going? Any exciting plans?